Saturday, January 14, 2017

Importing and analyzing models created by other CAD software in Energy3D: Part 1

Fig. 1: Solarize a COLLADA model in Energy3D
Fig.2: A house imported from SketchUp's 3D Warehouse
Energy3D is a relatively simple CAD tool that specializes in building simulation and solar simulation. Its current support for architectural design is fine, but it has limitations. It is never our intent to reinvent the wheel and come up with yet another CAD tool for architecture design. Our primary interest is in physics modeling, artificial intelligence, and computational design. Many users have asked if we can import models created in other CAD software such as SketchUp and then analyze them in Energy3D.

Fig. 3: A house imported from SketchUp's 3D Warehouse
I started this work yesterday and completed the first step today. Energy3D can now import any COLLADA models (*.dae files) on top of a foundation. The first step was the inclusion of the mesh polygons in the calculation of solar radiation. The polygons should be able to cast shadow on any object existing in an Energy3D model. This means that, if you have a 3D model of a neighboring building to the target building, you can import it into Energy3D so that it can be taken into consideration when you design solar solutions for your target. Once you import a structure, you can always translate and rotate it in any way you want by dragging its foundation, like any existing class of object in Energy3D.

Fig. 4: A house at night in Energy3D
Due to some math difficulties, I haven't figured out how to generate a solar radiation heat map overlaid onto the external surfaces of an imported structure that are exposed to the sun. This is going to be a compute-intensive task, I think. But there is a shortcut -- we can add Energy3D's solar panels to the roof of an imported building (Figure 1). In this way, we only have to calculate for these solar panels and all the analytic capabilities of Energy3D apply to them. And we can get pretty good results pretty quickly.

Fig. 5: A 3D tree imported from SketchUp's 3D Warehouse
Figures 2-4 show more examples of how houses designed with SketchUp look like in Energy3D after they are imported. This interoperability makes it possible for architects to export their work to Energy3D to take advantage of its capabilities of energy performance analysis.

Being able to import any structure into Energy3D also allows us to use more accurate models for landscapes. For instance, we can use a real 3D tree model that has detailed leaves and limbs, instead of a rough approximation (Figure 5). Of course, using a more realistic 3D model of a tree that has tens of thousands of polygons slows down the graphic rendering and simulation analysis. But if you can afford to wait for the simulation to complete, Energy3D will eventually get the results for you.

2 comments:

Seb SebSebSebSeb said...

That's really great ! Thanks a lot for achieving this option, very useful.
Will it be translatable one day ? Still available for French version.

Charles Xie said...

Thanks for offering to translate into French. We will get there one day. Right now we are working on making it worth the effort.