Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Energy2D and Quantum Workbench featured in Springer books


Two recently published Springer books have featured our visual simulation software, indicating perhaps that their broader impacts beyond their originally intended audiences (earlier I have blogged about the publication of the first scientific paper that used Energy2D to simulate geological problems).

A German book "Faszinierende Physik" (Fantastic Physics) includes a series of screenshots from a 2D quantum tunneling simulation from our Quantum Workbench software that shows how wave functions split when they smash into a barrier. The lead author of the book said in the email to us that he found the images generated by the Quantum Workbench "particularly beautiful."

Another book "Simulation and Learning: A Model-Centered Approach" chose our Energy2D software as a showcase that demonstrates how powerful scientific simulations can convey complex science and engineering ideas.

Quantum Workbench and Energy2D are based on solving extremely complex partial differential equations that govern the quantum world and the macroscopic world, respectively. Despite the complexity in the math and computation, both software present intuitive visualizations and support real-time interactions so that anyone can mess around with them and discover rich scientific phenomena on the computer.

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

European scientists use Energy2D to simulate submarine eruptions

The November issue of the Remote Sensing of Environment published a research article "Magma emission rates from shallow submarine eruptions using airborne thermal imaging" by a team of Spanish scientists in collaboration with Italian and American scientists. The researchers used airborne infrared cameras to monitor the 2011–2012 submarine volcanic eruption at El Hierro, Canary Islands and used our Energy2D software to calculate the heat flux distribution from the sea floor to the sea surface. The two figures in the blog post are from their paper.

According to their paper, "volcanoes are widely spread out over the seabed of our planet, being concentrated mainly along mid-ocean ridges. Due to the depths where this volcanic activity occurs, monitoring submarine volcanic eruptions is a very difficult task." The use of thermal imaging in this research, unfortunately, can only detect temperature distribution on the sea surface. Energy2D simulations turn out to be a complementary tool for understanding the vertical body flow.

Their research was supported by the European Union and assisted by the Spanish Air Force. Sadly, the intense daily flights to monitor the eruptions has cost the life of an air force pilot. I could not help wondering if our Energy2D simulation software has helped reduce the risks.

Although Energy2D started out as an educational program, we are very pleased to witness that its power has grown to the point that even scientists find it useful in conducting serious scientific research. We are totally thrilled by the publication of the first scientific paper that documents the validity of Energy2D as a research tool and appreciate the efforts of the European scientists in adopting this piece of software in their work.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Common architectural styles supported by Energy3D


Energy3D supports the design of some basic architectural styles commonly seen in New England, such as Colonial and Cape Cod. Its simple 3D user interface allows users to quickly sketch up a house with an aesthetically pleasing look -- with only mouse clicks and drags (and, of course, some patience). This makes it easy for middle and high school students to create meaningful, realistic designs and learn science and engineering from these authentic experiences -- who wants to keep doing those cardboard houses that look nothing like a real house for another 100 years?

The true enabler of science learning in Energy3D is its analytic capability that can tell students the energy consequences of their designs while they are working on them. Without this analytical capability, learning would have been cut short at architectural design (which undeniably is the fun part of Energy3D that entices students to explore many different design options that entertain the eyes). With the analytical capability, the relationship between form and function becomes a major driving force for student design. It is at this point that an Energy3D project becomes an engineering design project.

Architectural design, which focuses on designing the form, and engineering design, which focuses on designing the function, are equally important in both educational and professional practices. Students need to learn both. After all, the purpose of design is to meet various people's needs, including their aesthetic needs. This principle of coupling architectural design and engineering design is of generic importance as it can be extended to the broader case of integrating industrial design and engineering design. It is this coupling that marries art, science, and usability.

We are working on providing a list of common architectural styles that can be designed using Energy3D. These styles, four of them are shown in this article, show only the basic form of each style. Each should only take less than an hour to sketch up for beginners. If you want, you can derive more complex and detailed designs for each style.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Beautiful Chemistry


It is hard for students to associate chemistry with beauty. The image of chemistry in schools is mostly linked to something dangerous, dirty, or smelly. Yet Dr. Yan Liang, a collaborator and a materials scientist with a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota, is launching a campaign to change that image. The result of his work is now online at beautifulchemistry.net.

To bring the beauty of chemistry to the general public, Dr. Liang uses 4K UltraHD cameras and special lenses to capture chemical reactions in astonishing detail and advanced computer graphics to render stunning images of molecular structures.

Using the beauty of science to interest students has rarely been taken seriously by educators. The federal government has invested billions of dollars in instructional materials development. But from a layman's point of view, it is hard to imagine how children can be engaged in science if they do not fall in love with it. Beautiful Chemistry represents an attempt that could inspire a whole new genre of high-quality educational materials based on breathtaking scientific visualizations. How about Beautiful Physics and Beautiful Biology?

Our work is well aligned with this vision. Our interactive, visual Energy2D simulations bring a beautiful world of heat and mass flow to students like never seen before; our Energy3D software creates splendid 3D scenes based on scientific calculations; and our infrared visualization of the real world has uncovered a beautiful hidden universe through an IR lens. These materials demonstrate computational and experimental ways to marry science and beauty and have resulted in great enticements in science classrooms.

BTW, Dr. Liang is the artist who designed the splash panes of Energy2D and Energy3D.