Thursday, June 23, 2016

Simulating photovoltaic power plants with Energy3D

Modeling 1,000 PV panels in a desert
Solar radiation simulation
We have just added new modeling capacities to our Energy3D software for simulating photovoltaic (PV) power stations. With these additions, the latest version of the software can now simulate rooftop solar panels, solar parks, and solar power plants. Our plan is to develop Energy3D into a "one stop shop" for solar simulations. The goal is to provide students an accessible (yet powerful) tool to learn science and engineering in the context of renewable energy and professionals an easy-to-use (yet accurate) tool to design, predict, and optimize renewable energy generation.

Users can easily copy and paste solar panels to create an array and then duplicate arrays to create more arrays. In this way, users can rapidly add many solar panels. Each solar panel can be rotated around three different axes (normal, zenith, and azimuth). With this flexibility, users can create a PV array in any direction and orientation. At any time, they can adjust the direction and orientation of any or all solar panels.
PV arrays that are oriented differently


What is in the design of a solar power plant? While the orientation is a no-brainer, the layout may need some thinking and planning, especially for a site that has a limited area. Another factor that affects the layout is the design of the solar tracking system used to maximize the output. Also, considering that many utility companies offer peak and off-peak prices for electricity, users may explore strategies of orienting some PV arrays towards the west or southwest for the solar power plant to produce more energy in the afternoon when the demand is high in the summer, especially in the south.

Rooftop PV arrays
In addition to designing PV arrays on the ground, users can do the same thing for flat rooftops as well. Unlike solar panels on pitched roofs of residential buildings, those on flat roofs of large buildings are usually tilted.

We are currently implementing solar trackers so that users can design solar power plants that maximize their outputs based on tracking the sun. Meanwhile, mirror reflector arrays will be added to support the design of concentrated solar power plants. These features should be available soon. Stay tuned!

Friday, May 20, 2016

3D model of Ulm Minster created in just one day using Energy3D

Although our Energy3D software is billed as a piece of building simulation and engineering software, it has also become a powerful tool for constructing 3D models of buildings. With even more enhancements in the latest version (v 5.3.2), users can create incredibly complex structures in a short time.

Guanhua Chen, a graduate student from the University of Miami in Florida who joined my team this week as a summer intern, created an unbelievably detailed model of Ulm Minster -- in JUST ONE DAY. In total, his model has 373 elements.

Considering that he is very new to Energy3D (though he previously had some experiences with Maya and Unity3D), this somehow indicates just how easy Energy3D may be for 3D modeling, especially for novices. (As a matter of fact, I must confess that we cheated a bit because, as he was working on it, I rushed to add new features to the software on the fly to address his complaints. Then he just restarted the program and got onto a more performant version).


This capability will be extremely useful for engineering design, which must address both structure and function and their relationship. Being able to create complex structures rapidly and then study their functions based on the building simulation and solar simulation engines of Energy3D allows users to explore many design options and test them immediately, a feature that is critically important to engineering education.







Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Energy3D makes designing realistic buildings easy

The annual yield and cost benefit analyses of rooftop solar panels based on sound scientific and engineering principles are critical steps to the financial success of building solarization. Google's Project Sunroof provides a way for millions of property owners to get recommendations for the right solar solutions.



Another way to conduct accurate scientific analysis of solar panel outputs based on their layout on the rooftop is to use a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to do a three-dimensional, full-year analysis based on ab initio scientific simulation. Under the support of the National Science Foundation since 2010, we have been developing Energy3D, a piece of CAE software that has the goal of bringing the power of sophisticated scientific and engineering simulations to children and laypersons. To achieve this goal, a key step is to support users to rapidly sketch up their own buildings and the surrounding objects that may affect their solar potentials. We feel that most CAD tools out there are probably too difficult for average users to create realistic models of their own houses. This forces us to invent new solutions.

We have recently added countless new features to Energy3D to progress towards this goal. The latest version allows many common architectural styles found in most parts of the US to be created and their solar potential to be studied. The screenshots embedded in this article demonstrate this capability. With the current version, each of these designs took myself approximately an hour to create from scratch. But we will continue to push the limit.

The 3D construction user interface has been developed based on the tenet of supporting users to create any structure using a minimum set of building blocks and operations. Once users master a relatively small set of rules, they are empowered to create almost any shape of building as they wish.

Solar yield analysis of the first house
The actual time-consuming part is to get the right dimension and orientation of a real building and the surrounding tall objects such as trees.
Google's 3D map may provide a way to extract these data. Once the approximate geometry of a building is determined, users can easily put solar panels anywhere on the roof to check out their energy yield. They can then try as many different layouts as they wish to compare the yields and select an optimal layout. This is especially important for buildings that may have partial shades and sub-optimal orientations. CAE tools such as Energy3D can be used to do spatial and temporal analysis and report daily outputs of each panel in the array, allowing users to obtain fine-grained, detailed results and thus providing a good simulation of solar panels in day-to-day operation.

The engineering principles behind this solar design, assessment, and optimization process based on science is exactly what the Next Generation Science Standards require K-12 students in the US to learn and practice. So why not ask children for help to solarize their own homes, schools, and communities, at least virtually? The time for doing this can never be better. And we have paved the road for this vision by creating one of easiest 3D interfaces with compelling scientific visualizations that can potentially entice and engage a lot of students. It is time for us to test the idea.

To see more designs, visit this page.